>

About king_skwirl


Website:
king_skwirl has written 22 articles so far, you can find them below.


Diving is an endless love of ours

Most of our planet is underwater, sounds like more adventures to be had…

A small statue of Buddha sits at the southern end of Davis Reef. Schools of fish here can be so dense so as to block your view. Underwater photographers love this site, and call it the most picturesque reef in the Keys.

Victory Reef is a favorite of both beginner and advanced divers. It has everything a sports diver would want, including walls, vast numbers of corals, caves, sand channels with ledges and all kinds of sharks, fish, eels and turtles.

The Eagle wreck was intentionally sunk in 1985 to make an artificial reef. The 187-foot cargo ship was broken in two as a result of Hurricane Georges. The coral growth that has emerged since the ship’s sinking is fabulously multi-colored. You can reach the ship at about 70 feet and the bottom sections at around 110 feet. It is possible to go inside this wreck. Of course, this wreck is for the more advanced diver.

Sunk in 1987, the Duane wreck is an old Coast Guard Cutter that still stands upright in about 120 of water. The top of the crows nest is at about 60 feet and the lower portions of the ship at around 110 feet. This wreck is not for sports divers, but is great for the intermediate through advanced wreck diver.

The San Pedro Underwater Archaeological Preserve is located south of Indian Key. It was part of a Spanish fleet that sailed from Cuba in 1733 and was driven into the reef by a hurricane. This park was dedicated in 1989 and still holds bricks and pieces of the San Pedro

Paddling Alaskan style

When playing on the surface always remember it’s what you don’t see that makes things interesting too.

Prince William Sound, protected from the stormy Gulf of Alaska weather, has some of the best Alaska sea kayaking and the greatest diversity of wildlife habitat along the entire northern Pacific Coast. Check out one of our online videos to learn more about Prince William Sound’s diverse wildlife populations.

Enjoy the splendor of the Alaskan wilderness. Prince William Sound has 7,000 sq. miles of ocean, river deltas, tidal flats and glaciers. The forests and mountains provide first rate sea kayaking, camping and hiking opportunities. Prince William Sound is larger than Connecticut!

Bahia Honda sunset, Florida

Featuring an award winning beach and historic bridge, Bahia Honda State Park at mile marker 37 in the Florida Keys has become a favorite destination for visitors to our island paradise. The park, encompassing over 500 acres and an offshore island offers some of the best snorkeling and and beachcombing in Florida. The perfect and quiet getaway for the entire family.

Bahia Honda State Park is located Oceanside on US Hwy. 1 and MM 37 on Bahia Honda Key. The quickest way to get to us from most places is to take the Florida Turnpike south to the end. This will put you on US Hwy 1. South. Just come on down US 1, watch for the green and white mile marker signs on your right as you come down the highway. Make a left-hand turn at MM 37 into the park and YOU’RE HERE!!! For more detailed directions, call us at (305) 872-3210.

http://www.bahiahondapark.com/

Nothing like the ocean for adventure

The 120-mile Florida Keys island chain is home to the continental United States’ only living-coral barrier reef. This teeming backbone of marine life runs the length of the Keys about five miles offshore and offers Florida Keys scuba diving vacation memories that last a lifetime.

Our coral formations are famous for their abundance of fish, from impressive schools of blue-striped grunts to toothy green moray eels. The U.S. government established the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary to protect our marine habitat.

Preserving the reef is a top priority for a good reason. There is no more versatile marine destination in the world. We have coral-encrusted ship wrecks and intricate natural coral formations. We have shallow reefs for snorkelers, and a range of deeper reefs for experienced divers.

Most dive sites are equipped with convenient mooring buoys to save the reef from anchors and make it easy for boaters to tie off. Most sites are a short boat ride from our islands, where dozens of highly professional dive operators are ready to cater to you.

Once you visit the Keys, you’ll see why some of the some of the most renowned dive photographers and writers in the world make this their home base.

http://www.fla-keys.com/diving/

The Cathedral, Maui

1st Cathedral
The first of 2 great cavernous scuba diving sites, 1st Cathedral is set up as a large room with many openings for light and sealife. The ceiling of the cathedral has many holes to bring in light and make this site a fantastic place to photograph. Inside is an alter-like boulder and a tube coral and sponge covered pinnacle in shades of orange and red. Outside of the cathedral is a 60 foot high arch and wall that makes this dive even more interesting.

2nd Cathedral
From the main vaulted arch, 2nd Cathedral is sectioned into mulitple caverns. Among the many picturesque sealife here, Maui divers will find black coral, eels, prawns, and lobster hiding in the crevaces.

Ahihi and La Perouse Bay Marine Reserve, Maui

Makena Alanui Road, Makena – South Maui
This marine preserve encompasses all the shoreline from Ahihi Bay to La Perouse Bay. It is a private, secluded, scuba and snorkel paradise with some of the clearest waters in Maui. There are no land facilities but the clear water and its mixture of coral and lava make for memorable underwater views. The shoreline is very rocky so there is little sand to cloud the water. The rugged landscape and underwater formations were formed during the last lava flow from Mount Haleakala in 1790. .

Directions:

Ahihi Bay is about 1.5 miles south of the Maui Prince Hotel. La Perouse Bay is about 2 miles south of that. Both are well beyond Makena on Makena Alanui Road. The paved road ends at LaPerouse Beach.

Useful Information:

* No lifeguard
* No facilities
* This area is a marine preserve so there is NO fishing, hunting, or removing rock, terrestrial or marine life
* Clear water – excellent for snorkeling
* Wear shoes as there is no sand, only very rough lava flows
* Gravel access
* Rocky shoreline
* Limited roadside parking
* Excellent snorkeling and diving when waves are calm – not good for general swimming
* Stay out of Anchialine pools to protect the natural resources
* Avoid walking on live coral
* La Perouse Overlook gives a great view of La Perouse Bay, the site of Maui’s last lava flow

Makena Alanui Road, Makena – South Maui
This marine preserve encompasses all the shoreline from Ahihi Bay to La Perouse Bay. It is a private, secluded, scuba and snorkel paradise with some of the clearest waters in Maui. There are no land facilities but the clear water and its mixture of coral and lava make for memorable underwater views. The shoreline is very rocky so there is little sand to cloud the water. The rugged landscape and underwater formations were formed during the last lava flow from Mount Haleakala in 1790. .
Directions:
Ahihi Bay is about 1.5 miles south of the Maui Prince Hotel. La Perouse Bay is about 2 miles south of that. Both are well beyond Makena on Makena Alanui Road. The paved road ends at LaPerouse Beach.
Useful Information:
  • No lifeguard
  • No facilities
  • This area is a marine preserve so there is NO fishing, hunting, or removing rock, terrestrial or marine life
  • Clear water – excellent for snorkeling
  • Wear shoes as there is no sand, only very rough lava flows
  • Gravel access
  • Rocky shoreline
  • Limited roadside parking
  • Excellent snorkeling and diving when waves are calm – not good for general swimming
  • Stay out of Anchialine pools to protect the natural resources
  • Avoid walking on live coral
  • La Perouse Overlook gives a great view of La Perouse Bay, the site of Maui’s last lava flow

Long Key camping area with view, Florida

The Spanish named this island “Cayo Vivora” or Rattlesnake Key because its shape resembles a snake with its jaws open. In the early 20th century, Long Key was the site of a luxurious fishing resort that was destroyed during the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935. Today, visitors can explore this island by canoeing through a chain of lagoons or hiking two land-based trails. The Golden Orb Trail leads visitors through five natural communities to an observation tower that provides a panoramic view of the island and its profusion of plant and animal life. Some of the best bonefishing in the Keys is found here. Full-facility campsites overlook the Atlantic Ocean. Located at Mile Marker 67.5, 67400 Overseas Highway.

http://www.floridastateparks.org/longkey/

Page 1 of 41234»

Trailhoncho Topics

Biker's choice:

Road or Mtn Biker?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...